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TIPS, INSIGHTS AND THE LATEST FROM THE EXPERTS BEHIND CAKEPHP

Felix Geisendörfer - Recipies for successful CakePHP projects

Felix liked to Get Things Done™. And through experience and what became an interactive idea and experience sharing productivity session, he explained mechanisms and methods that he has used to achieve the best results for projects in the shortest time possible.

Communication. While this means your team should be in contact, and that those contact points should be quality communication, it doesn't mean that instant communication is a requirement. Communication mechanisms would ideally be: decentralised and work in an offline capacity (at least for partial functionality).

Return on investment is an interesting statistic to consider when responding to or creating a new item of communication. Provide a concise message. Enough to ensure the intention of the communication is clear, and ambiguity is reduced if not eliminated. Email is a great tool, especially for the following: Timezone differences, announcements, spawning debates that require discussion, emergency notifications / reports, mailing lists, shared email accounts and automated reporting / information.

Using Email over an instant messaging mechanism for spawning debates allows contributors to formulate a constructed response. This can assist the better understanding of some ones input to the discussions, as instant messaging can be difficult for items that require discussion.

Instant messaging has good and bad traits:

  1. Good Stuff
    1. Instant
    2. Group Chats / conference calls
    3. Varying methods of communication
    4. Various formats (text, voice, video)
  2. Bad Stuff
    1. Distracting (interrupts workflow)
    2. History tracking / compatibility
    3. Citations / logs
Task management helps keep projects on track. However the truth is that there is no overall solution. We do the best we can to manage all the information we need to be successful, through a variety of tools.

Problems that exist are:

  1. Getting tasks into the system (May be the laziness of users)
  2. Tracking tasks that manage to make it into the system
  3. Getting those tasks done

Tools available:

  1. Pen and Paper (plain text files)
  2. OmniFocus (Mac Only)
  3. Lighthouse / TheChaw
One of the CakeFest attendees suggested post-it notes on a wall, so that the tam involved in pursuing the tasks can have some physical interaction with them, making the experience more productive and fun.

So with this in mind, Felix quickly went over what has worked for him and his company:

  1. Check emails twice a day only.
  2. Turn off instant messaging tools in the morning
  3. Set clear distinct goals for the day, and achieve those goals

How to fail at unit testing. Felix described some common myths about unit testing, how he feels failing is possible and how to improve your approach.

Failed unit testing can come from factors such as: Attempting to reach 100% code coverage all the time, misunderstanding test driven development and expecting that all developers / users can write unit tests.

Success can be achieved by approaching projects with a top-down approach, incorporating performance tests and re-factoring code.

Continuous integration was presented in a basic format, going through the setup that Felix has found useful, making use of git post-receive hooks, and parsing of results to send notifications when necessary. In terms of increasing productivity and performance overall, Felix has begun testing Pair programming, where there is one computer for two people, and the development process is discussed ongoing, meaning that a lot of bugs an individual would miss are caught by the secondary developer on the first code pass.

Virtualization though open source and free products like VirtualBox and VMWare Server are worthwhile investigating for cheap scaling testing during development.

Version control was introduced, referencing the change of CakePHP to git from subversion, pointing out the benefits including: decentralization, can work offline, can work semi-online though the use of adhoc networks, its very fast to operate and its more intelligent with the storage of information. Following this, a detailed example of three separate working repositories was demonstrated.

Latest articles

Responsive Websites vs. Native Apps

Do you know what the difference is between responsive websites vs. native apps? With users more and more likely to be browsing your website on their mobiles, have you considered how they see and experience it across devices? A bad mobile experience may be likely to turn potential customers away, so it’s vital to ensuring that all touchpoints match your brand experience and draw customers in. But how do you go about that - what is the best solution for you - responsive website or a native app? Below we look at the differences between the two, however, the best solution for you will be highly dependent on your website and business/consumer needs, be sure to speak with your development team to get the best fit for you! Responsive vs native Responsive Web Design is the methodology that recommends the design and implementation of a website that responds to user behavior and environment based on the screen size, orientation and operating system of their device. While a native/mobile app, once the app has been downloaded, it’s stored directly on their device, so they will be able to access it in every context. Native apps can be used both online and offline. These two mobile solutions do not answer the same needs. In today’s world, all websites should be responsive to mobile devices, but not everyone needs a mobile app. Mobile or native app’s are expensive and time consuming to produce, they also can irritate users who do not see value in downloading them. However, should your product work well or need an app to work well in, you should investigate it. Generally the development time and cost of a native app can make this look like a poor option, however, if your product or need is one of the following, an app is definitely the way to go.

  • interactivity /Gaming is required: an App is the best choice if you require an immersive and interactive user experience.
  • Regular usage and personalization: Are you planning that your users use the app on a regular basis?
  • Complex calculations or reporting: Think banking or financial calculators.
  • Offline accessibility: Is your concept something that you want users to be able to use offline?
A key point to take into consideration when deciding what is the best fit for your business concept, is to keep your goals in  mind. If your goal is purely from a marketing and content distribution consideration, to ensure usability on mobile platforms, then a responsive website is what you need. However, if you are requiring a more immersive brand experience, a native app is required.

Importance of backing up data for small businesses - tips and tricks for you

Data is essential to any business - regardless of the size. And with the recent ransomware attacks, it is important to keep backups regularly. A loss of your business’s data, from a down server or a ransomware attack, can cost a company a lot of money. Types of backups You can either back up online to an out of network cloud server, to a physical storage location or to an offline drive. Either should have you secured from a network attack and will enable you to be up and running after-the-fact. Having a backup strategy cannot be stressed enough, here are some strategies that you could follow:

  1. Cloud backups - keeping data offsite is helpful should you experience a natural disaster.
  2. Encryption of data in transit.
  3. Multiple backups offsite - ensuring 2 or 3 backups are kept.
  4. Testing of backups - ensuring that all backups taken are viable for use should the need arise.
Regular backups can be a life saver - ransomware attacks, natural disasters, corrupt hardware can strike at any moment. Being prepared can save your business money in the long run. Some other tips that you can consider following include
  • Having a file organization standard. Develop a standard way of organizing your files so that you or your users will always know where data belongs.
  • Determine critical files or data. Organize and sort through the files to ensure critical data or files are kept secure and regularly backed-up.
  • Create a local backup solution.
  • Create an offsite backup.
  • Automate your backup procedures.
How do you get started? Its key to create a backup routine, which includes the following information
  • A checklist for the file or data that you need to backup;
  • A backup schedule for times that your backup system will run;
  • Verify the backup to ensure the data is intact.
Also remember, for your website and hosted applications, to check with your local hosting provider as they usually offer backups. For local development work, always use a repository for code and documents, like git, while for binaries, use cloud storage so all you lose, if your hard drive was to crash, is the work of the current day.

With the latest ransomware attack, here’s what you need to know

With the latest attack, Petya, fresh in our minds, we thought it would be a good time to discuss what exactly a ransomware attack is and how you, as a business, can protect yourselves from such. These cybersecurity attacks not only attack individuals and small to medium sized business, but also large multinational enterprises from around the world. What is clear is that the attack from the past week, Petya/GoldenEye while similar, is a lot more serious than the attack of the previous month - the WannaCry worm attack that struck hundreds of thousands of computers.   Have we gotten your attention? Good! The first real way to protect yourself, and your business, is to know what the attacks are and what they look like. And then to move onto how to set yourself up so that you are secured against such an attack. With the latest ransomware worm, the ransomware infects computers and locks down their hard drives. Then demanding $300 ransom in digital currency Bitcoin.
The email account associated with the ransomware will have been blocked, so even if victims pay, they won't get their files back. Many experts are calling for people to not pay the ransom. The virus or worm is spread by infecting multiple computers on a network, and is initially contracted via an outside source, commonly an email. Many companies were hit severely this time round, as they did not update their Microsoft packages, leaving them vulnerable to the attack.  Am I at risk you may be asking yourself? Well potentially. The great news is that if you have a Windows machine, and it is up to date with security updates, then you are fine. The bad news is that if you are on a network with a machine that is not up to date, then this will cause a problem for you should they get the virus. Top tips for keeping you and your network secure:

  1. Keep all servers and network connections up to date with the latest security updates;
  2. Be sure to backup your computer regularly and keeping a recent backup copy off-site.
  3. Brief all network users on what phishing emails look like, the importance of not on links;
  4. Make sure your antivirus software is up to date.

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