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Felix Geisendörfer - Recipies for successful CakePHP projects

Felix liked to Get Things Done™. And through experience and what became an interactive idea and experience sharing productivity session, he explained mechanisms and methods that he has used to achieve the best results for projects in the shortest time possible.

Communication. While this means your team should be in contact, and that those contact points should be quality communication, it doesn't mean that instant communication is a requirement. Communication mechanisms would ideally be: decentralised and work in an offline capacity (at least for partial functionality).

Return on investment is an interesting statistic to consider when responding to or creating a new item of communication. Provide a concise message. Enough to ensure the intention of the communication is clear, and ambiguity is reduced if not eliminated. Email is a great tool, especially for the following: Timezone differences, announcements, spawning debates that require discussion, emergency notifications / reports, mailing lists, shared email accounts and automated reporting / information.

Using Email over an instant messaging mechanism for spawning debates allows contributors to formulate a constructed response. This can assist the better understanding of some ones input to the discussions, as instant messaging can be difficult for items that require discussion.

Instant messaging has good and bad traits:

  1. Good Stuff
    1. Instant
    2. Group Chats / conference calls
    3. Varying methods of communication
    4. Various formats (text, voice, video)
  2. Bad Stuff
    1. Distracting (interrupts workflow)
    2. History tracking / compatibility
    3. Citations / logs
Task management helps keep projects on track. However the truth is that there is no overall solution. We do the best we can to manage all the information we need to be successful, through a variety of tools.

Problems that exist are:

  1. Getting tasks into the system (May be the laziness of users)
  2. Tracking tasks that manage to make it into the system
  3. Getting those tasks done

Tools available:

  1. Pen and Paper (plain text files)
  2. OmniFocus (Mac Only)
  3. Lighthouse / TheChaw
One of the CakeFest attendees suggested post-it notes on a wall, so that the tam involved in pursuing the tasks can have some physical interaction with them, making the experience more productive and fun.

So with this in mind, Felix quickly went over what has worked for him and his company:

  1. Check emails twice a day only.
  2. Turn off instant messaging tools in the morning
  3. Set clear distinct goals for the day, and achieve those goals

How to fail at unit testing. Felix described some common myths about unit testing, how he feels failing is possible and how to improve your approach.

Failed unit testing can come from factors such as: Attempting to reach 100% code coverage all the time, misunderstanding test driven development and expecting that all developers / users can write unit tests.

Success can be achieved by approaching projects with a top-down approach, incorporating performance tests and re-factoring code.

Continuous integration was presented in a basic format, going through the setup that Felix has found useful, making use of git post-receive hooks, and parsing of results to send notifications when necessary. In terms of increasing productivity and performance overall, Felix has begun testing Pair programming, where there is one computer for two people, and the development process is discussed ongoing, meaning that a lot of bugs an individual would miss are caught by the secondary developer on the first code pass.

Virtualization though open source and free products like VirtualBox and VMWare Server are worthwhile investigating for cheap scaling testing during development.

Version control was introduced, referencing the change of CakePHP to git from subversion, pointing out the benefits including: decentralization, can work offline, can work semi-online though the use of adhoc networks, its very fast to operate and its more intelligent with the storage of information. Following this, a detailed example of three separate working repositories was demonstrated.

Latest articles

CakePHP API Plugin

Are you creating an API in CakePHP? This task looks very popular these days, and most of our clients need an API to expose certain services to their own rich client applications, or third party services. Even if it's easy to configure CakePHP to expose a REST API, and there are other plugins that could help you building an API, we found ourselves working on specific tweaks per project to adjust the way the API was designed, so we decided to wrap all these ideas and create a specific CakePHP API Plugin including

  • Services definition
  • Integrated CRUD
  • Nested resources
  • Pagination
  • Sorting
  • Associations
  • Versioning
  • Custom Extensions (data format / transformers)
  • Self documentation
We've gathered all the best practices around API building and CakePHP and wrapped them into an easy to install and setup Plugin to be used as the foundation of your API intensive CakePHP projects. Let's walkthru some of the Plugin features using an example application: the bookmarker tutorial http://book.cakephp.org/3.0/en/tutorials-and-examples/bookmarks/intro.html We'll assume you've already created a new CakePHP application and configured it to use the bookmarker database (schema dump here http://book.cakephp.org/3.0/en/tutorials-and-examples/bookmarks/intro.html#creating-the-database).

Setting up the CakePHP API Plugin

Download the plugin first composer require cakedc/cakephp-api:dev-master Then ensure plugin is loaded in you bootstrap.php file Plugin::load('CakeDC/Api', ['bootstrap' => true, 'routes' => true]);

Now you have an API!

Test your newly configured "default" API using curl curl -X GET http://bookmarker.dev/api/bookmarks You'll get something similar to: { "status": "success", "data": [], "pagination": { "page": 1, "limit": 20, "pages": 0, "count": 0 }, "links": [ { "name": "self", "href": "http:\/\/bookmarker.dev\/api\/bookmarks", "rel": "\/api\/bookmarks", "method": "GET" }, { "name": "bookmarks:add", "href": "http:\/\/bookmarker.dev\/api\/bookmarks", "rel": "\/api\/bookmarks", "method": "POST" } ] } If you look at the provided output you'll identify we've used a JSend default renderer (status, data) and we append some extra data under 'links' (HATEOAS dynamically generated for your CRUDs) and pagination. The specific "extensions" used can be configured and custom extensions created for your specific needs, see https://github.com/CakeDC/cakephp-api/blob/master/docs/Documentation/extensions.md We'll publish a couple tutorials soon covering some of the features implemented, and explaining how did we use the CakePHP API Plugin to address specific use cases. Meanwhile, please check the documentation here https://github.com/CakeDC/cakephp-api/blob/master/docs/Documentation/overview.md

Giving back to the community

This Plugin's development has been sponsored by the Cake Development Corporation. Contact us if you are interested in:  

Create Google app for web oauth2 login step by step

Here's a step by step tutorial about how to create a web oauth2 app in Google dashboard.

Google app oauth login app 1
  • Add some cool name for your new Google app project and click "Create"
Google app oauth login app 2
  • Under "Library" section, create a new Google+ API project
Google app oauth login app 3
  • Click "Enable" in the dashboard tab
Google app oauth login app 4
  • Under "Credentials" menu, click "Oauth consent screen" tab and enter some cool name to be displayed to users when requesting their access to your application. Then click "Save".
Google app oauth login app 5
  • Under "Credentials" menu, click "Create credentials" and select "Oauth client ID".
Google app oauth login app 6
  • Now click "Web application" radio, and type your domain name and oauth callback
    • Under "Authorized Javascript origins", add your domain name: mydomain.com
    • Under "Authorized redirect URIs", add all the allowed callback url's to your application. For example if you are using CakeDC/Users Plugin, you'll need to add mydomain.com/auth/google
  • Then click "Save"
Google app oauth login app 7
  • Copy the Iauth client and secret id's into your application configuration
  • Be careful, some browsers will append blank spaces to the codes, remove any extra blank space (trim)
Google app oauth login app 8
  • Ensure the API is enabled, you can test your application now and check there is "Traffic" displayed
  You have now a Google app configured to provide Oauth2 login to your web application. Enjoy!                  

Login with Google Oauth2 in CakePHP using CakeDC/Users Plugin

This article is inspired by this question in Stack Overflow and belongs to a series of articles describing the step by step tutorial to configure CakeDC Users Plugin with the most commonly used Oauth2 providers, in this case we'll configure Google login. We'll assume you have a working CakePHP application with no Auth configured yet.

Setup

Use composer to install the CakeDC Users Plugin and the required oauth2 providers To be able to configure the callbacks in Google dashboard, you'll need to create a virtual host for you application. You don't need a working domain name, you could use something like "mydomain.dev" but Google requires a domain name (no localhost). composer require cakedc/users:@stable composer require league/oauth2-google:@stable Load it from your bootstrap.php file Plugin::load('CakeDC/Users', ['routes' => true, 'bootstrap' => true]); Run migrations to add 2 new tables: 'users' and 'social_accounts' bin/cake migrations migrate -p CakeDC/Users

Configuration

Load the Component in your src/Controller/AppController.php public function initialize() { parent::initialize(); // // ... // $this->loadComponent('CakeDC/Users.UsersAuth'); }

Create a new Google application

<?php // /config/users.php file contents $config = [ 'Users.Social.login' => true, 'OAuth.providers.google.options.clientId' => 'CLIENT_ID_HERE', 'OAuth.providers.google.options.clientSecret' => 'SECRET_HERE', ]; return $config;
  • Modify your bootstrap.php file to ensure the config file is loaded this way
Configure::write('Users.config', ['users']); //add this line before Plugin::load('CakeDC/Users... Plugin::load('CakeDC/Users', ['routes' => true, 'bootstrap' => true]); This file will override any configuration key present in the Plugin, you can check the configuration options here Configuration. Now you are ready to go to your login page and click "Sign up with Google". Upon successful login, a new user will be created in your users table and related oauth2 tokens will be saved in the social_accounts table. The new user created will have the "user" role (by default, but customizable). And based on your Auth rules, this user will be able to access your site. You are done!

Read more about CakeDC Users Plugin

Giving back to the community

This Plugin's development has been sponsored by the Cake Development Corporation. Contact us if you are interested in: We hope you've enjoyed this short tutorial covering the Google login, stay tunned for new CakePHP + Users Plugin tutorials coming soon...

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