CakeDC Blog

TIPS, INSIGHTS AND THE LATEST FROM THE EXPERTS BEHIND CAKEPHP

Using the CakeDC Tags plugin for CakePHP

This is an introduction to using the CakeDC Tags plugin for CakePHP. I'll take you through a new project creation, and the addition of the Tags plugin to your project for use with tagging a Blog model on your project. You should be able to take the skills learnt here to any other project, and start taking advantage of the Tags plugin for tagging your models appropriately.

Lets get started by baking a new project:

cake bake project blog1

Follow the prompts to complete the baking operation.

You will now have a "blog1" directory available. Change into that directory:

cd blog1

ensure that the `tmp` directory is writable:

chmod -R 777 tmp

Open up the `config/database.php.default` file in your favourite editor. Immediately choose to "Save as..." and save the file in the same location omitting the ".default" part of the filename. So save the file as `config/database.php`.

Configure the options at the bottom to match the database credentials for your application. Mine are as follows:

<?php
class DATABASE_CONFIG {
   var $default = array(
      'driver' => 'mysql',
      'persistent' => false,
      'host' => 'localhost',
      'login' => 'dev',
      'password' => 'dev',
      'database' => 'blog1',
      'prefix' => '',
   );
}

For the moment, I have remove the 'test' datasource, as we won't use that right now.

Go ahead and create your MySQL database, and a simple table to hold blog items:

CREATE DATABASE `blog1`;
USE `blog1`;

CREATE TABLE `blogs` (
   `id` CHAR(36) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
   `title` VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL,
   `body` TEXT,
   `created` DATETIME,
   `modified` DATETIME
);

Now lets bake the controller, model and views for this blogs table, in order to be able to add and edit content. Once this is complete, we'll begin integrating the tags plugin into the application.

First bake the model:

cake bake model blog

Next bake the controller. The following bakes all the "public" actions for this controller:

cake bake controller blog public

And finally, the views:

cake bake view all

Browse around your application at the address: /blogs to begin with to ensure that your app is functioning correctly. You should be able to add, edit, delete and view blog entries.

Time to get cracking on the Tags plugin. Our objective here is to tag each blog entry with an arbitrary tag at add / edit time to allow us to easily categorise content we are posting.

In order to download and install the Tags plugin, I'll be using git. You can however download an archive from the github website, and extract that archive into your `APP/plugins` directory. In either case, the result will be a `tags` directory in your `APP/plugins` directory, containing the contents of the CakeDC tags plugin.

From your `APP` directory (in this example, the APP directory is `blog1`), clone the tags repository:

git clone git://github.com/CakeDC/tags.git plugins/tags

The first thing that we need to do now that the Tags plugin has been added to our project, is to create the tables required to store the tag information. These are available in schema's and migrations within the Tags plugin, so you don't need to handle the SQL yourself, just use the cake console to create the tables for you:

If you prefer using the builtin CakePHP schema mechanism, or you are not sure what the "migrations" plugin is, you can create the database tables like this:

cake schema create schema -plugin tags -name tags

If however, you are familiar with using the migrations plugin, or you want to use the migrations plugin for this project, add the migration plugin to your project, and then run the migrations:

git clone git://github.com/CakeDC/migrations.git plugins/migrations

cake migration -plugin tags all

Either method is fine.

Next up, we need to add the `Taggable` behavior from the `Tags` plugin to our model to enable all the awesome functionality. Add the following variable to your `Blog` model in `APP/models/blog.php`:

public $actsAs = array(
   'Tags.Taggable'
);

Finally, we need to add a new input for the tags on our add and edit screens, to allow users to customise the tags they want for the blog posts. Simply add a new input called 'tags' to your forms, such as the following:

echo $this->Form->input('tags', array('type' => 'text'));

Note that this needs to be done for both your add and edit views.

You can also make this be of type `textarea`, if you need gigantic amounts of tags. `text` is fine though, to allow a good number of tags, and to minimise the input space.

This is all you need to do to enable your content to be tagged! Looking back at all the instructions so far, the bulk of the content has been on how to create a new project, bake the model, views and controller, and the addition of plugins. In terms of code addition, we've only added a behavior to the Blog model, and a new input to the add and edit views.

To test your tagging, use a comma to separate your tags when using the tags input. Using a comma allows you to enable users to add multiple-word tags.

What now!? You can tag stuff, thats pretty cool. You probably want to look up blog posts based on tags now. Thats already provided for you in the Tags Controller quick comes with the Tags plugin. Browse to `/tags` to see the tags controller index action from the tags plugin render all the tags that you have added to your blog so far.

There is a whole lot more that you can do with tagging in terms of both operation and the visual representation of the tags themselves. Stay tuned for more blog articles explaining our plugins and other interesting PHP and CakePHP code from myself and the rest of the CakeDC team.

UPDATE: An excellent guide on how to style the tags with CSS has been written by @WyriHaximus, check it out here.

Latest articles

Users plugin 9.x for CakePHP4

CakePHP 4 is out for some time (4.0.2 at the time of writing this post) and some of you already asked "Is there a cakedc/users version for cake4?" a couple times... The answer is YES!. We had a meeting after we realized AuthComponent was going to be deprecated, the authentication/authorization layer was leaning towards
Middlewares and getting a new Plugin home ourside of the core.
We decided to embrace the new middlewares and provide native compatibility from version 9.x of the plugin. Before we explain how is it going to work, and proceed to setup a project from scratch a couple answers to potential questions: * Are you going to maintain cakedc/users 8.x for CakePHP 3.x?
  * Yes, as long as you use it, we'll keep it maintained. Version 8.x will be a LTS version. We'll consider backporting some features from 9.x but the
  main objective of 8.x is to provide stability over time to existing CakePHP 3 projects.
* I'm planning to migrate my project from CakePHP 3 to CakePHP 4, what's the migration path for cakedc/users?
  * Keep the version 8.x of the plugin for some time. Complete your upgrade and then decide if you want to migrate to cakedc/users 9.x.
  We wrote a migration guide here when you decide it's time to move forward.
* AuthComponent is going to explode in CakePHP 4.x ?
  * No, it's deprecated, but deprecated also means it's completely functional. Just keep it until you decide to upgrade it.
 
This blog post is the first of a series of articles about cakedc/users 9.x where we'll explain how to use the plugin from scratch, it's benefits and
also the way the new authentication & authorization layers work for a CakePHP 4.x application. We've kept our main objectives for this plugin: provide a quick, easy, flexible users management plugin to help you build awesome products on top of CakePHP 4. So let's create a new project * Ensure you have a working develop environment, download a development vagrant machine or pick some other's environment. composer create-project cakephp/app:^4 users9 Now we have a new CakePHP 4 project skeleton created under folder users9.
Test it using bin/cake server then go to http://localhost:8765 and check it's all green.   all green checks for cakephp 4   * Install the plugin using
composer require cakedc/users:^9 * Now configure your application to use the plugin in your src/Application.php bootstrap() method, add
$this->addPlugin(\CakeDC\Users\Plugin::class); * Create the required tables in your configured Datasource using Migrations:
bin/cake migrations migrate -p CakeDC/Users This will create an empty `users` table and `social_accounts` to hold your authenticatio data. * Now create a superadmin user
bin/cake users addSuperuser It will create a superadmin user and a random password, copy the user and password to a safe place. Now start the standalone server using bin/cake server again, and go to the home page http://localhost:8765... you'll see the login form.   login form cakephp 4 and cakedc/users
If you use the superadmin credentials previously generated, you'll be able to login and continue to the home page. Total setup process, possibly less than 5 minutes if your network allows it... How is it actually working? * Once the plugin is added to you Application class through the Plugin class, we implement the  `AuthenticationService` and `AuthorizationService` provider interfaces, and use
the `middleware()` plugin callback to inject the configured middlewares into the Application middleware queue, see the `MiddlewareQueueLoader`.
We do it to keep the loading and configuration of the middlewares in one place, and decide the middlewares needed based on your configuration, for example if you are using
social login with Facebook, we configure which middlewares you need loaded and the correct order.
Check LINK for customization options of the plugin. We'll deal with customization in other articles of this series. * CakePHP core Authentication and Authorization middlewares are also loaded, with the provided configuration. Check file vendor/cakedc/users/config/users.php for the
default configuratio used. You'll see there we're using by default Session, Form, Token, Cookie and Social. Depending on your configuration we'll check if you're authenticated in the following order:
  * Your identity already in the session
  * You've posted login form and your credentials are in the request data
  * There is a token present we can retrieve, usually for API stateless token based auth
  * There is a remember me cookie present
  * Your identity is available after social login, and we can use it to login into the app
 
If all these methods fail, you're redirected to the login page, `/login` by default (configurable, of course).   * But that's the first step, once we can identify who are you, the next step (Authorization) is to determine if you're allowed to access the page you're trying to open. The plugin default configuration has 2
Authorization methods, superuser and rbac.
  * If you're user is a superuser, you are granted
  * If there is a rule in the rbac configuration to match your role and the current page, you are granted
 
If none of the above, you are not authorized, and redirected to the home page. One of the important concepts about the new authentication layer in CakePHP is: "Authentication happens before you hit AppController".
So when you get to your Controller, CakePHP alreay knows you're an existing user and you have permission to access the page. All the abstraction and complexity
of maintaining the authentication is now extracted and managed OUTSIDE of your controllers, reducing their complexity. Give it a try in your next project! Let us know how it goes and share you experiences with us, we'll be happy to help in the community channels.  

CakeFest 2019 Recap

Here we are, a couple weeks out of CakeFest 2019. What an experience in Japan!  We didn’t really know what to expect when we decided to finally make the trip to host in Tokyo. We were given great welcoming from the PHP community, and each person we met left us with wonderful memories. Another welcoming surprise was the low price of food, and delicious ramen. Our team definitely utilized all of the free time we had.            Let’s talk about the event, and the workshops. Jorge Gonzalez, Jose Rodriquez, and Mark Story definitely delivered in the knowledge department. The participation was fantastic, although the class size was smaller than in other years. We’ve had a lot of requests for their slides, so those are included in the link below ⬇️ One thing that was different this year, is that we had different venues for the workshops and conference. This makes it difficult for the team, with transferring our equipment in such a busy city (shout out to the quick responding taxi services).  We did try the metro when we had less baggage, and got up close and personal with the locals. Speaking of venues, we cannot thank DMM.com and SmartNews enough. We are still dreaming of an office like DMM’s with live plants growing up the walls and a complete installed watering system.  These venues were overly accommodating, making this one of the best conferences we’ve had.          If you are a PHPer or specifically working with CakePHP, the speakers topics were overflowing with useful information. Like Yuki Kanazawa’s tips for a smooth upgrade to CakePHP 3, or Tadahisa Motooka’s ideas about database replication. Kazuki Higashiguchi helped talk us through painful testing of code, and Sho Ito walked us through an initial OSS with CakePHP. We had such a great lineup this year, and we cannot wait to have some speakers return. Other great talks included David Yell, Daniel Voyce, Jose Gonzalez, and Wim Godden, and superstar core members Mark Story and Jose Rodriguez.  We even had to be confronted with details about life after CakePHP (GASP!) from Andrej Griniuk.    Unfortunately, no event can be executed without some roadblocks, and we aren’t exempt. We had a couple late cancellations (understandable) from speakers, but definitely made up the time with chats and lightning talks. There was so much information exerted during the short 2 days, that we all probably needed and extra day to take notes. Luckily, we did that for you. All of the slides included during CakeFest are available at the link below as well.    So, would we come back and host in Japan again? YES! We hope to do so sooner rather than later. Are there some things we will change on our end? Yes, again.  We hoped for higher numbers for workshops, as the information given is invaluable. We hope that in the future, all conference attendees will take advantage of those sessions as well. You can stay up to date with all things CakeFest at CakeFest.org - we are actually working on adding a history feature to reference past events.      We could not have done all of this without the amazing sponsors we had this year:    Cake Development Corporation  Shizen Energy  BASE  Lancers  DMM JetBrains Connehito  Marks Software SmartNews  ESM   Follow our speakers on Twitter:   Yuki Kanazawa - @yakitori009  Mark Story - @mark_story Jose Rodriguez - @jose_zap Jorge Gonzalez - @steinkelz Tadahisa Motooka - @t_motooka Kazuki Higashiguchi -  @hgsgtk Sho Ito - @itosho David Yell - @Yelldavid Daniel Voyce - @voycey_web Jose Gonzalez - @savant Wim Godden - @wimgtr Andrej Griniuk - @andrej_gr   CLICK HERE to view the CakeFest 2019 workshop and speaker slides.   Now, we want to hear from you! If you attended, what did you think about CakeFest Japan? What did you enjoy the most/least? If you did not attend: what has held you back from joining us? Let us know - email: community@cakephp.org.

How To: CakePHP, CakeDC Users and Amazon Cognito

Long time ago, in 2010, CakeDC Users plugin for CakePHP was released for CakePHP 1.3. Almost nine years has passed and the initial code has changed dramatically, offering new and exciting features. In 2011 the team released the first version to be compatible with the new CakePHP 2.0. At this moment we focused in keeping the same features and only adding support for the new version of the framework. When CakePHP 3.0 arrived in 2015 we decided to refactor Users plugin completely, making it easier to use but also adding terrific features out of the box like:

  • Social login with most popular providers
  • RBAC permissions
  • Superuser
  • And much more..
It continued evolving and today we will show how to use the latest provider we have added to the social login feature in the plugin, Amazon Cognito. Let’s talk first about it. We'll use Amazon Cognito basically as an Oauth 2.0 Server. It'll let you manage your user groups and users. It provides a simple interface to sign up, sign-in and also use many social providers like Facebook, Google and Amazon. It also allows using SAML 2.0 providers and they promise it may scale to millions of users. You can also fully customize form and buttons. Best of all, it is free for the first 50,000 logins. Let's start configuring Amazon Cognito in AWS Panel. We must first create a user pool. You could have different user pools and each of them having an exclusive set of features.     Now we need to customize our new pool adding a pool name, etc. We can use default settings for testing purposes. If you want to customize fields you should then go through steps.     Once we check everything is okay we can click on Create Pool.     Now, it's time to setup App Clients. If you are familiar with OAuth and another services it is like creating a Facebook or Twitter App.     And then click on Add an app client.  Just add a name and save.   Remember to write down your client ID and client secret because they will be needed later to configure Users plugin. The next step is to setup app client settings. We need to configure:
  • Callback url: set it to /auth/cognito if you want to use plugin defaults.
  • The flow to Authorization code grant and the scopes you must select at least email and openid. You can select profile in case you want to get all the user information from cognito.
      Finally we need to configure a domain name for the user pool. Use a custom domain or a subdomain from Cognito.     Now that we are ready with Cognito setup, let’s easily create a new CakePHP app, to connect with Amazon Cognito. First, we need a new CakePHP app: composer create-project --prefer-dist cakephp/app users-app Remember to create a new empty database. Now we can go to users-app folder and run: composer require cakedc/users After CakeDC Users plugin is installed, we need to install Oauth 2 Cognito provider package: composer require cakedc/oauth2-cognito CakeDC Users plugin configuration is pretty easy: $this->addPlugin('CakeDC/Users'); public function pluginBootstrap() { parent::pluginBootstrap(); Configure::load('users'); } return [ 'Users.Social.login' =--> true, 'OAuth.providers.cognito.options.clientId' => 'CLIENT_ID', 'OAuth.providers.cognito.options.clientSecret' => 'CLIENT_SECRET', 'OAuth.providers.cognito.options.cognitoDomain' => 'DOMAIN', 'OAuth.providers.cognito.options.region' => 'REGION', ];
  • Load the Users Plugin bin/cake plugin load CakeDC/Users
  • If you prefer to do this manually, add this line at the end of your src/Application.php bootstrap() method
  • Add the following line into AppController::initialize() method $this->loadComponent('CakeDC/Users.UsersAuth');
  • Add the following code to your src/Application.php pluginBootstrap() method to ensure we override the plugin defaults
  • Add the file config/users.php with your specific configuration, including
In case you used a custom domain for you user pool, you can replace cognitoDomain option by using hostedDomain option (including protocol): 'OAuth.providers.cognito.options.hostedDomain' => 'YOUR DOMAIN', Scope option defaults to email openid . If you selected another scopes, you may want to add them as well: 'OAuth.providers.cognito.options.scope' => 'email openid profile', Finally we just need to go to /login.     and click on Sign in with Cognito. If everything is setup correctly you should see the following screen:   You can previously create a user in AWS panel or just click signup on that screen. After login you will be redirected to homepage in CakePHP App. As you can see, the setup for both Cognito and App are simple if you use default settings. However after testing defaults, you can start customizing forms, fields, adding third party apps. You have no limits.  

Last words

We create and maintain many open source plugins as well as contribute to the CakePHP Community as part of our open source work in CakeDC. While developing this provider, we've also published a generic Oauth2 Amazon Cognito repository. Reference  

We Bake with CakePHP