CakeDC Blog

TIPS, INSIGHTS AND THE LATEST FROM THE EXPERTS BEHIND CAKEPHP

CakePHP 3.0 is coming

For those of you who may have missed it, this week we released the first alpha of CakePHP 3.0, with a significant update to begin our move towards beta. I'm really excited to see how the project is evolving, and the amazing work that the members of the core team are doing, as well as what all those contributing are helping to build. But its important to look back in retrospect, and understand from where we've come.

Baking the Cake

If you're not aware, CakePHP has now been almost 10 years in the making. That's a long time for a project to stay as active as it has. Everyone has their favorite framework, and some like a few more than others, but one thing that's clear in my mind is that CakePHP has always been very popular, even until today.

The project started when I teamed up with Michal Tatarynowicz, who had created the basic feature set of what would become CakePHP. I had begun work on what is currently the model layer in the pre 3.0 version of the framework, and continued leading the project when Michal left shortly after we open sourced under the MIT license. This was back in 2005, and working with PHP 4. Back then we had to work around the language a lot, as it was lacking the object oriented features which we now all take for granted. We had to emulate or actually build out many of the native aspects now included with PHP, which made the task all the more complicated. Don't get me wrong, it was fun times, as the language was growing fast and we were all pushing it along. It's no secret the Rasmus isn't a huge fan of frameworks, but like Rails for Ruby, many of the frameworks for PHP have also helped the language gain a place in many people's hearts.

But time goes by, and like all things, PHP grew up and matured as a language. A lot of the features we had implemented for CakePHP in PHP 4 now became native with PHP 5, so although we'd provided the solutions when they weren't available, these now became redundant. But people and hosting companies were slow to adopt. The framework had grown a large community by then, so it was difficult for us to just drop support for PHP 4 and leave them without their framework. It was also in our interest to support PHP by prompting people to upgrade, so we took the middle road. This is where our infamous backwards compatibility for PHP 4 stems from.

There were disagreements between core members of the project, where some advocated for jumping the gun and releasing a version which required the latest version of PHP, but I refused to allow our community to be left behind. These are people who had grown up with the framework, people who relied on us to keep a solution which allowed anyone to use it. In hindsight you could say that those developers weren't worth supporting, but I see our community as a family, and like my Marine training taught me, no man gets left behind.

However, the years past, and we went from 1.2 to 1.3, and CakePHP begun to mature into a powerful solution for rapid application development. We also saw how adoption for PHP 5 improved, and hosts begun to offer broad support, which is when we decided to make the move to PHP 5.2 with the release of CakePHP 2. There were mixed feelings about the decision to not jump straight to 5.3, but I still feel today that, in allowing the framework to mature as it has on a stable code base, people who have counted on us would hopefully understand that choice.

Growing up as a Community

Like the years that have come before us, we all grow up as developers, and PHP the language grows with us. The impulse we've seen over the past years with the releases of 5.3, 5.4 and 5.5 have shown how the community can really build a powerful language. But it's not only the language that grows, but the community around it as well. We've seen over the past years how interoperability between frameworks has become a requirement, and the technical expectations of developers have become consistently more demanding. We've seen how the rise of packages managers, like Composer, have facilitated this distributed and modular approach to building PHP applications. So when we looked at what we expected for 3.0, as Jose Lorenzo said in the technical keynote at CakeFest, our annual conference, "we're all older and wiser", so it's time to put those years of experience to good use.

So, for CakePHP 3.0 we decided that now is a good time to take our community and move everything towards a stronger and brighter future. This means that we've made some of the important decisions, which align the framework with the coming features in the language, and provide the same framework goodness people are used to, but deliver it with new features which upgrade the solution for another 10 years to come. This also means breathing new life into many of the core aspects of the framework, which in some cases have become its winning features, and in others the infamous trademarks of CakePHP.

I invite you all, those who love CakePHP and even those who don't, to give this alpha of the latest major version of the framework a try, and let us know how well it tastes. We hope that this is the beginning of a great new chapter in the history of CakePHP, and one which lets us grow further, and together, as a community. Thank you.

Latest articles

Why Choosing The Right Development Team Is Important

 Listen, we get it… it is the age of do-it-yourself everything, but one thing that I will remain firm on is the fact that a good web presence (and web application/website) is absolutely essential for any business. The fast track to a good application starts with choosing the right development team. Whether you decide as a business owner to have an internal development team, or outsource the work, it is a very important action for success.   Having a user friendly site will do just that, get you friends. Or in this case, “traffic” to your webpage. What can a development company or team do that those “quick and easy build a site” tools can’t? A lot. But firstly, they can build custom features and integrations. If someone visits your site, it is likely they will stick around if there are things to do/see/read, thus decreasing your “bounce rate” - which is a nice way to say clicking the little red x or back button.    Another benefit to choosing the right development team is having someone on hand to work on debugging, error fixing, and training for maintainers you may have on your team. For example, with CakeDC, we offer consulting, project management and training. This means your project manager can be with you for the long term (always available to fix those ERROR codes or upgrade), or train your tech team to manage the application themselves. Development is a long term commitment.  Our team keeps clients accompanied during all stages of development, from the initial call and vision building, to implementation and delivery… and even offer after build management in case there is a future need. It is important to make sure your site/application is always running smoothly and dedicate time to enhancing it. Nothing is more frustrating to a potential client or consumer than trying to run an action and getting broken links or useless site features. A good developer will ensure security is enabled as well (number one priority). The more features you have, and the easier they are to use, means the more conversions and leads you can get and the easier they are to obtain.   Hiring a team does not always mean things will be perfect, there are so many options available: commercial teams, freelancers, internal tech departments… so it is important to do your research before making the plunge. When speaking to a lot of our potential clients, a common complaint I get is that developers are not accessible (or at least not quickly). Many times, I hear the same story… a company hires a freelance developer working on their own time, the freelancer builds the initial project, then disappears and the company is left with a site full of errors. Our team focuses a lot on communication with clients, and we make ourselves reachable at any time. We even have developers in different timezones to suit the needs of clients, and we keep them in the loop every step of the way. CakeDC has a project management system that is accessible to every client so that they are able to track work and time being used. Not to mention, we chat via email, skype, slack, phone… you name it.    Plus, our team works together, that way the work promised gets delivered.     Basically, what I am trying to say is to choose a development team, and choose wisely. The team should start with asking your needs and wants, and your vision for the project. An experienced development team can bring that project to life. The decision you make now, can save time, money, and many meltdowns in the future. Don’t say I didn’t warn you (just kidding…kinda).   

Users plugin 9.x for CakePHP4

CakePHP 4 is out for some time (4.0.2 at the time of writing this post) and some of you already asked "Is there a cakedc/users version for cake4?" a couple times... The answer is YES!. We had a meeting after we realized AuthComponent was going to be deprecated, the authentication/authorization layer was leaning towards
Middlewares and getting a new Plugin home ourside of the core.
We decided to embrace the new middlewares and provide native compatibility from version 9.x of the plugin. Before we explain how is it going to work, and proceed to setup a project from scratch a couple answers to potential questions: * Are you going to maintain cakedc/users 8.x for CakePHP 3.x?
  * Yes, as long as you use it, we'll keep it maintained. Version 8.x will be a LTS version. We'll consider backporting some features from 9.x but the
  main objective of 8.x is to provide stability over time to existing CakePHP 3 projects.
* I'm planning to migrate my project from CakePHP 3 to CakePHP 4, what's the migration path for cakedc/users?
  * Keep the version 8.x of the plugin for some time. Complete your upgrade and then decide if you want to migrate to cakedc/users 9.x.
  We wrote a migration guide here when you decide it's time to move forward.
* AuthComponent is going to explode in CakePHP 4.x ?
  * No, it's deprecated, but deprecated also means it's completely functional. Just keep it until you decide to upgrade it.
 
This blog post is the first of a series of articles about cakedc/users 9.x where we'll explain how to use the plugin from scratch, it's benefits and
also the way the new authentication & authorization layers work for a CakePHP 4.x application. We've kept our main objectives for this plugin: provide a quick, easy, flexible users management plugin to help you build awesome products on top of CakePHP 4. So let's create a new project * Ensure you have a working develop environment, download a development vagrant machine or pick some other's environment. composer create-project cakephp/app:^4 users9 Now we have a new CakePHP 4 project skeleton created under folder users9.
Test it using bin/cake server then go to http://localhost:8765 and check it's all green.   all green checks for cakephp 4   * Install the plugin using
composer require cakedc/users:^9 * Now configure your application to use the plugin in your src/Application.php bootstrap() method, add
$this->addPlugin(\CakeDC\Users\Plugin::class); * Create the required tables in your configured Datasource using Migrations:
bin/cake migrations migrate -p CakeDC/Users This will create an empty `users` table and `social_accounts` to hold your authenticatio data. * Now create a superadmin user
bin/cake users addSuperuser It will create a superadmin user and a random password, copy the user and password to a safe place. Now start the standalone server using bin/cake server again, and go to the home page http://localhost:8765... you'll see the login form.   login form cakephp 4 and cakedc/users
If you use the superadmin credentials previously generated, you'll be able to login and continue to the home page. Total setup process, possibly less than 5 minutes if your network allows it... How is it actually working? * Once the plugin is added to you Application class through the Plugin class, we implement the  `AuthenticationService` and `AuthorizationService` provider interfaces, and use
the `middleware()` plugin callback to inject the configured middlewares into the Application middleware queue, see the `MiddlewareQueueLoader`.
We do it to keep the loading and configuration of the middlewares in one place, and decide the middlewares needed based on your configuration, for example if you are using
social login with Facebook, we configure which middlewares you need loaded and the correct order.
Check LINK for customization options of the plugin. We'll deal with customization in other articles of this series. * CakePHP core Authentication and Authorization middlewares are also loaded, with the provided configuration. Check file vendor/cakedc/users/config/users.php for the
default configuratio used. You'll see there we're using by default Session, Form, Token, Cookie and Social. Depending on your configuration we'll check if you're authenticated in the following order:
  * Your identity already in the session
  * You've posted login form and your credentials are in the request data
  * There is a token present we can retrieve, usually for API stateless token based auth
  * There is a remember me cookie present
  * Your identity is available after social login, and we can use it to login into the app
 
If all these methods fail, you're redirected to the login page, `/login` by default (configurable, of course).   * But that's the first step, once we can identify who are you, the next step (Authorization) is to determine if you're allowed to access the page you're trying to open. The plugin default configuration has 2
Authorization methods, superuser and rbac.
  * If you're user is a superuser, you are granted
  * If there is a rule in the rbac configuration to match your role and the current page, you are granted
 
If none of the above, you are not authorized, and redirected to the home page. One of the important concepts about the new authentication layer in CakePHP is: "Authentication happens before you hit AppController".
So when you get to your Controller, CakePHP alreay knows you're an existing user and you have permission to access the page. All the abstraction and complexity
of maintaining the authentication is now extracted and managed OUTSIDE of your controllers, reducing their complexity. Give it a try in your next project! Let us know how it goes and share you experiences with us, we'll be happy to help in the community channels.  

CakeFest 2019 Recap

Here we are, a couple weeks out of CakeFest 2019. What an experience in Japan!  We didn’t really know what to expect when we decided to finally make the trip to host in Tokyo. We were given great welcoming from the PHP community, and each person we met left us with wonderful memories. Another welcoming surprise was the low price of food, and delicious ramen. Our team definitely utilized all of the free time we had.            Let’s talk about the event, and the workshops. Jorge Gonzalez, Jose Rodriquez, and Mark Story definitely delivered in the knowledge department. The participation was fantastic, although the class size was smaller than in other years. We’ve had a lot of requests for their slides, so those are included in the link below ⬇️ One thing that was different this year, is that we had different venues for the workshops and conference. This makes it difficult for the team, with transferring our equipment in such a busy city (shout out to the quick responding taxi services).  We did try the metro when we had less baggage, and got up close and personal with the locals. Speaking of venues, we cannot thank DMM.com and SmartNews enough. We are still dreaming of an office like DMM’s with live plants growing up the walls and a complete installed watering system.  These venues were overly accommodating, making this one of the best conferences we’ve had.          If you are a PHPer or specifically working with CakePHP, the speakers topics were overflowing with useful information. Like Yuki Kanazawa’s tips for a smooth upgrade to CakePHP 3, or Tadahisa Motooka’s ideas about database replication. Kazuki Higashiguchi helped talk us through painful testing of code, and Sho Ito walked us through an initial OSS with CakePHP. We had such a great lineup this year, and we cannot wait to have some speakers return. Other great talks included David Yell, Daniel Voyce, Jose Gonzalez, and Wim Godden, and superstar core members Mark Story and Jose Rodriguez.  We even had to be confronted with details about life after CakePHP (GASP!) from Andrej Griniuk.    Unfortunately, no event can be executed without some roadblocks, and we aren’t exempt. We had a couple late cancellations (understandable) from speakers, but definitely made up the time with chats and lightning talks. There was so much information exerted during the short 2 days, that we all probably needed and extra day to take notes. Luckily, we did that for you. All of the slides included during CakeFest are available at the link below as well.    So, would we come back and host in Japan again? YES! We hope to do so sooner rather than later. Are there some things we will change on our end? Yes, again.  We hoped for higher numbers for workshops, as the information given is invaluable. We hope that in the future, all conference attendees will take advantage of those sessions as well. You can stay up to date with all things CakeFest at CakeFest.org - we are actually working on adding a history feature to reference past events.      We could not have done all of this without the amazing sponsors we had this year:    Cake Development Corporation  Shizen Energy  BASE  Lancers  DMM JetBrains Connehito  Marks Software SmartNews  ESM   Follow our speakers on Twitter:   Yuki Kanazawa - @yakitori009  Mark Story - @mark_story Jose Rodriguez - @jose_zap Jorge Gonzalez - @steinkelz Tadahisa Motooka - @t_motooka Kazuki Higashiguchi -  @hgsgtk Sho Ito - @itosho David Yell - @Yelldavid Daniel Voyce - @voycey_web Jose Gonzalez - @savant Wim Godden - @wimgtr Andrej Griniuk - @andrej_gr   CLICK HERE to view the CakeFest 2019 workshop and speaker slides.   Now, we want to hear from you! If you attended, what did you think about CakeFest Japan? What did you enjoy the most/least? If you did not attend: what has held you back from joining us? Let us know - email: community@cakephp.org.

We Bake with CakePHP