CakeDC Blog

TIPS, INSIGHTS AND THE LATEST FROM THE EXPERTS BEHIND CAKEPHP

CakePHP 3.0 is coming

For those of you who may have missed it, this week we released the first alpha of CakePHP 3.0, with a significant update to begin our move towards beta. I'm really excited to see how the project is evolving, and the amazing work that the members of the core team are doing, as well as what all those contributing are helping to build. But its important to look back in retrospect, and understand from where we've come.

Baking the Cake

If you're not aware, CakePHP has now been almost 10 years in the making. That's a long time for a project to stay as active as it has. Everyone has their favorite framework, and some like a few more than others, but one thing that's clear in my mind is that CakePHP has always been very popular, even until today.

The project started when I teamed up with Michal Tatarynowicz, who had created the basic feature set of what would become CakePHP. I had begun work on what is currently the model layer in the pre 3.0 version of the framework, and continued leading the project when Michal left shortly after we open sourced under the MIT license. This was back in 2005, and working with PHP 4. Back then we had to work around the language a lot, as it was lacking the object oriented features which we now all take for granted. We had to emulate or actually build out many of the native aspects now included with PHP, which made the task all the more complicated. Don't get me wrong, it was fun times, as the language was growing fast and we were all pushing it along. It's no secret the Rasmus isn't a huge fan of frameworks, but like Rails for Ruby, many of the frameworks for PHP have also helped the language gain a place in many people's hearts.

But time goes by, and like all things, PHP grew up and matured as a language. A lot of the features we had implemented for CakePHP in PHP 4 now became native with PHP 5, so although we'd provided the solutions when they weren't available, these now became redundant. But people and hosting companies were slow to adopt. The framework had grown a large community by then, so it was difficult for us to just drop support for PHP 4 and leave them without their framework. It was also in our interest to support PHP by prompting people to upgrade, so we took the middle road. This is where our infamous backwards compatibility for PHP 4 stems from.

There were disagreements between core members of the project, where some advocated for jumping the gun and releasing a version which required the latest version of PHP, but I refused to allow our community to be left behind. These are people who had grown up with the framework, people who relied on us to keep a solution which allowed anyone to use it. In hindsight you could say that those developers weren't worth supporting, but I see our community as a family, and like my Marine training taught me, no man gets left behind.

However, the years past, and we went from 1.2 to 1.3, and CakePHP begun to mature into a powerful solution for rapid application development. We also saw how adoption for PHP 5 improved, and hosts begun to offer broad support, which is when we decided to make the move to PHP 5.2 with the release of CakePHP 2. There were mixed feelings about the decision to not jump straight to 5.3, but I still feel today that, in allowing the framework to mature as it has on a stable code base, people who have counted on us would hopefully understand that choice.

Growing up as a Community

Like the years that have come before us, we all grow up as developers, and PHP the language grows with us. The impulse we've seen over the past years with the releases of 5.3, 5.4 and 5.5 have shown how the community can really build a powerful language. But it's not only the language that grows, but the community around it as well. We've seen over the past years how interoperability between frameworks has become a requirement, and the technical expectations of developers have become consistently more demanding. We've seen how the rise of packages managers, like Composer, have facilitated this distributed and modular approach to building PHP applications. So when we looked at what we expected for 3.0, as Jose Lorenzo said in the technical keynote at CakeFest, our annual conference, "we're all older and wiser", so it's time to put those years of experience to good use.

So, for CakePHP 3.0 we decided that now is a good time to take our community and move everything towards a stronger and brighter future. This means that we've made some of the important decisions, which align the framework with the coming features in the language, and provide the same framework goodness people are used to, but deliver it with new features which upgrade the solution for another 10 years to come. This also means breathing new life into many of the core aspects of the framework, which in some cases have become its winning features, and in others the infamous trademarks of CakePHP.

I invite you all, those who love CakePHP and even those who don't, to give this alpha of the latest major version of the framework a try, and let us know how well it tastes. We hope that this is the beginning of a great new chapter in the history of CakePHP, and one which lets us grow further, and together, as a community. Thank you.

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CakeFest 2021 Decisions

Well… 2021 is already feeling a little 2020ish to me, what about you? While I had high hopes of things being back to normal as far as travel, events, etc. It seems as though we still have a ways to go in that department.  

Difficult Decisions

Our events are no exception to this. While virtual CakeFest was a great success, I think that the CakePHP team, as well as the community had hoped for an in-person event… sooner, rather than later. Everyone is missing the adventures and camaraderie that physical meet-ups bring. Unfortunately, we may be waiting a little longer. The team couldn’t stand to make the tough call on the event alone, without consulting with the community.  

The Community Has Spoken

So, CakePHP took to the polls. The question was posted via social media, and included in the January newsletter: Should CakeFest be virtual or in-person (Los Angeles, specifically)? The consensus was no surprise, and 85%+ of bakers voted for a virtual event this year. One follower mentioned that he “wasn’t ready to risk the event not happening at all, so a virtual event is better than no event”. I couldn’t agree more.    A virtual conference was uncharted territory for CakeFest planners and attendees, but in my opinion.. it came together so wonderfully, that it is hard to be disappointed that it will be happening again. So here’s to gathering once again from the comfort of your own space, and hoping that everyone remembers to have their cake ready! Mark Story can even (virtually) cut it for you if you prefer.   The call for sponsors and speakers will be opening soon, so make sure to contact the CakePHP / CakeFest team with any questions you may have ahead of time.  Planning on attending? We would love to hear from you! What are some topics that you would like covered in the workshops or talks? EMAIL US HERE.   *Digital hug*  

Baking Smarter, Not Harder in 2021

After the year we had… our new motto should be work smarter, not harder, in 2021? Am I right? Luckily, CakePHP community and core members are extremely helpful and constantly working to make baking easier. Here are some things that will assist you with your CakePHP projects….

Plugins:

I recently wrote a blog featuring some of the best (voted by the community) CakePHP plugins - you can see it HERE. A full catalogue of CakePHP plugins is available at https://plugins.cakephp.org. It is no secret that plugins are essential for developers. CakeDC has a few of our own as well, you can get details at:  https://www.cakedc.com/plugins. The good news is, if you don’t see one, but have a great idea, you can build and release your own! To learn more about this process, Jose Gonzalez explains it in his CakeFest 2021 Talk.     Lots of other videos / talks / tutorials are located in the CakePHP Youtube channel as well.
 

Tools:

If you follow us on social media, we highlight a lot of tools released from the community.  One of the most popular is the debugging tool: https://book.cakephp.org/4/en/development/debugging.html A commonly used one is to help updating your composer.json while upgrading https://toolbox.dereuromark.de/utilities/upgrade   You can see more on THIS cakePHP tools list from Dereuromark!
 

Support:

I talk about support channels a lot… because well… what is open source without them? Every time I take a virtual stroll to the slack channels, I am amazed at the participation and interaction between community members. It’s like having your own development team available anytime you need them. Rest assured that if you have an issue that's causing a blocker, someone in the chat will (most likely) have a solution. A full list of support channels was listed in our last blog, but if you missed it, here you go: Discourse forum: https://discourse.cakephp.org Stack Overflow: https://stackoverflow.com/tags/cakephp IRC: https://kiwiirc.com/nextclient/irc.freenode.net#cakephp Slack: https://cakesf.herokuapp.com
 

The Book:

If you’re a veteran baker, you already know this. However, this wouldn't be a helpful blog without mentioning the all mighty book… The CakePHP bookThis is where you should start on your cake journey… read it… read it again. Then, reference back to it when you need it. There is an average of 46k users utilizing the book monthly (184k sessions). That should speak for itself.
 

Newsletter:

The CakePHP team releases a newsletter each month. This is a good resource if you’re looking to catch up on a month’s worth of news in one place.  Usually included is: releases, helpful tools, training/event dates, specials, surveys, and more.  You can see previous newsletters & subscribe HERE.   I will close this with a shameless plug: if you want to work a whole lot smarter this year, let someone else do the work for you. Check out all of the CakeDC services offered at cakedc.com/services.    Here’s to 2021 being a lot easier… more peaceful… and tasty!  

Saying Goodbye To 2020 Is A Piece of Cake

I never thought that I would be so excited to say… the year is coming to an end. What a year it has been. Let’s focus on some good things that happened for us this year.

CakePHP Community

Our team worked as closely as ever with the CakePHP community. We have hosted training sessions and multiple online meetups - for which we had consistent attendance and involvement. We have enjoyed getting to know each baker that attends and interacts with us. It was a great year for releases, too. If you follow the social media pages, you’re up to date with all of the new features and tools that are released in real time. Not to mention new and updated plugins. You can see all of the latest releases in the BAKERY.  

CakeFest

While we usually get to travel to some amazing city in the world and meet with the attendees in person, clearly that was not going to be an option this year. For the first time ever, the event was held virtually. Being so involved, and responsible for the success of the event, was stressful and frightening to say the least, but alas…it came together wonderfully.  We were able to have attendees that may not have been able to join us otherwise, and the participation was unprecedented. I am so thankful for the wonderful sponsors, speakers, attendees, and contributors that made the event possible.  In case you didn’t know, all of the CakeFest 2020 videos have been released. You can view them in the CakeFest archive, or on the CakePHP Youtube channel. Don’t forget to subscribe to the channel, and I will tell you why later.    Now… what can be expected in 2021? LOTS!

Increased Involvement

We want to expand the kitchen, if you will. We have an amazing group of core developers, and they would love to have more involvement from the community. If you’ve ever thought about contributing and getting involved, there are many options, you can check out details HERE.   

More documentation / blogs

Speaking of getting more people involved, this will include blogging. We have so many great plugins, but maybe not enough documentation to support the training on them. The core team is on board and we will all be working hard to provide more documentation for the framework. In fact, we even some some community members that have already volunteered to provide more blog contributions to the bakery. Maybe you’d like to as well?!  

Video Tutorials

One suggestion that we get consistently is that we need more video tutorials. We agree! We are going to be updating our YouTube channel and will hopefully be adding more video tutorials as soon as Q1. We will also make sure that training sessions / meetups will be available to subscribers for playback. We would love to hear your suggestions for content, you can email us at community@cakephp.org and let us know what you’d like to see. 
 

Support

As always, CakePHP has many support channels, and this will not change in the new year. In fact, we plan to make it even easier to connect with other bakers.   Here are some current available support options: Discourse forum: https://discourse.cakephp.org Stack Overflow: https://stackoverflow.com/tags/cakephp IRC: https://kiwiirc.com/nextclient/irc.freenode.net#cakephp Slack: https://cakesf.herokuapp.com
  Want to have your opinion heard? The core team wants to know what you want for CakePHP 5. Please take a moment and fill out a quick SURVEY to let them know.    We can’t wait to bake with you in 2021. Wishing you all a happy holiday season and a very happy new year!  

We Bake with CakePHP