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Cake Development Corporation - The benefits of working for such a great team!

 

Cake Development Corporation was established in 2007 by Larry Masters, one of the founders of CakePHP. CakeDC provides professional development and consultancy services for a range of business needs, including startups, e-commerce and enterprise level corporations.

Besides being experts behind the CakePHP framework, the team is backed by 50 years of combined experience. The team is highly talented, extremely approachable and work as a focused team when putting forward any piece of work.

When the company was developed, the proposal was simple: to create a commercial entity that allows people to live and breathe CakePHP, doing what they love day-to-day, while also providing everyone with a means.

Did we mention that we are based all over the world? Working remotely? – it’s one of the many benefits you sign into when working for CakeDC. We're an international team that offers commercial support and professional training for one of the most popular PHP frameworks used by developers around the world.

But being based all over the world, we do look for key individuals to work with us. Some of the key aspects we look for in the ideal candidate include:

  • Good track history of Work Commitment and demonstrates good work ethic
  • Someone with full knowledge and/or experience of a full development cycle
  • Someone that demonstrates that they have good team spirit and takes initiatives
  • Ensuring they fulfill the qualifications outlined in the job post

For us at Cake Development Corporation, we feel that working remotely affords our employees a variety of benefits. Below are some of the main benefits from our team working remotely vs. being all centrally located.

  • With Remote employees we tend to have a lot more personal satisfaction which drives us to be independent.
  • Being based remotely, you obtain good results because the commitment is not pressuring for time, and being confined or distracted in a room with persons that may pose these issues.
  • We find that being a remote employee usually leads to being goal oriented and having the will to take the risk in working for as long as they want. Leaving the option be compensated for every hour of it and also doing exactly what they want.
  • Remote employees tend to be more productive as they are working in a conducive environment suited to their specific and individual needs.

At the Cake Development Corporation, we look out for employees who show

  • Discipline
  • Honesty and accountability
  • Ambitious
  • Focused
  • If Experienced, Demonstrate that experience

The distance doesn’t come in the way of getting to know our team or in the way of delivery impeccable work – with daily chats, catchups and integration tools, the team functions just like any other! CakeDC is on the forefront of modern organisations, recruiting top software developers and delivering top notch solutions to their clients!

We are a dynamic company based on meritocracy, where everyone is given the opportunity to make an impact on the various levels and disciplines of the business, as well as playing a key role in the CakePHP community as the commercial entity behind the framework - the opportunity for growth is endless.

And we haven’t even really gone into the real company benefits.. At CakeDC, everyone is appreciated, recognised and given the space and opportunity to grow.

Some of our many benefits include:

  • 100% flexible work schedules, you are given the choice to define your hours of availability, 36 hours minimum required per week..
  • Remote working environment with an international team and clients.
  • The opportunity to Engage in paid open source projects, becoming an integral part of the development of the community. At CakeDC, all developers work 20% of their (paid development) time on open source projects.
  • Annual performance based bonuses.
  • Paid Parental Leave. Up to 16 weeks maternity leave and up to 6 weeks paternity leave, at 100% paid salary. Single fathers, or primary caregivers, can also take up to 16 weeks.
  • Available vacation time:
    • 10 days working days (not including weekends) per year. A minimum time of 12 months working at the company is required to take vacation.
    • 20 days working days (not including weekends) per year. A minimum time of 24 months working at the company is required to take vacation.
    • 30 working days (not including weekends) per year.A minimum time of 36 months working at the company is required to take vacation.
    • Christmas and New years are Company Paid Vacations.
  • Team outings and meetups – Don’t think that because this team is based internationally that we don’t know each other. We know the importance of getting together once in awhile, so we have annual meet ups!
  • A fully paid for IDE (PHPStorm) licence to assist you with our work and make your life a little easier.

So how do you know if you are right to apply to be a part of CakeDC?

Well, if you aren’t shy, you know your stuff (Web application development, object orientated analysis and design, and of course, knowledge of CakePHP), are willing to put yourself out there and learn, and have a zest for life – then we are the right place for you!

Latest articles

How To: CakePHP, CakeDC Users and Amazon Cognito

Long time ago, in 2010, CakeDC Users plugin for CakePHP was released for CakePHP 1.3. Almost nine years has passed and the initial code has changed dramatically, offering new and exciting features. In 2011 the team released the first version to be compatible with the new CakePHP 2.0. At this moment we focused in keeping the same features and only adding support for the new version of the framework. When CakePHP 3.0 arrived in 2015 we decided to refactor Users plugin completely, making it easier to use but also adding terrific features out of the box like:

  • Social login with most popular providers
  • RBAC permissions
  • Superuser
  • And much more..
It continued evolving and today we will show how to use the latest provider we have added to the social login feature in the plugin, Amazon Cognito. Let’s talk first about it. We'll use Amazon Cognito basically as an Oauth 2.0 Server. It'll let you manage your user groups and users. It provides a simple interface to sign up, sign-in and also use many social providers like Facebook, Google and Amazon. It also allows using SAML 2.0 providers and they promise it may scale to millions of users. You can also fully customize form and buttons. Best of all, it is free for the first 50,000 logins. Let's start configuring Amazon Cognito in AWS Panel. We must first create a user pool. You could have different user pools and each of them having an exclusive set of features.     Now we need to customize our new pool adding a pool name, etc. We can use default settings for testing purposes. If you want to customize fields you should then go through steps.     Once we check everything is okay we can click on Create Pool.     Now, it's time to setup App Clients. If you are familiar with OAuth and another services it is like creating a Facebook or Twitter App.     And then click on Add an app client.  Just add a name and save.   Remember to write down your client ID and client secret because they will be needed later to configure Users plugin. The next step is to setup app client settings. We need to configure:
  • Callback url: set it to /auth/cognito if you want to use plugin defaults.
  • The flow to Authorization code grant and the scopes you must select at least email and openid. You can select profile in case you want to get all the user information from cognito.
      Finally we need to configure a domain name for the user pool. Use a custom domain or a subdomain from Cognito.     Now that we are ready with Cognito setup, let’s easily create a new CakePHP app, to connect with Amazon Cognito. First, we need a new CakePHP app: composer create-project --prefer-dist cakephp/app users-app Remember to create a new empty database. Now we can go to users-app folder and run: composer require cakedc/users After CakeDC Users plugin is installed, we need to install Oauth 2 Cognito provider package: composer require cakedc/oauth2-cognito CakeDC Users plugin configuration is pretty easy: $this->addPlugin('CakeDC/Users'); public function pluginBootstrap() { parent::pluginBootstrap(); Configure::load('users'); } return [ 'Users.Social.login' =--> true, 'OAuth.providers.cognito.options.clientId' => 'CLIENT_ID', 'OAuth.providers.cognito.options.clientSecret' => 'CLIENT_SECRET', 'OAuth.providers.cognito.options.cognitoDomain' => 'DOMAIN', 'OAuth.providers.cognito.options.region' => 'REGION', ];
  • Load the Users Plugin bin/cake plugin load CakeDC/Users
  • If you prefer to do this manually, add this line at the end of your src/Application.php bootstrap() method
  • Add the following line into AppController::initialize() method $this->loadComponent('CakeDC/Users.UsersAuth');
  • Add the following code to your src/Application.php pluginBootstrap() method to ensure we override the plugin defaults
  • Add the file config/users.php with your specific configuration, including
In case you used a custom domain for you user pool, you can replace cognitoDomain option by using hostedDomain option (including protocol): 'OAuth.providers.cognito.options.hostedDomain' => 'YOUR DOMAIN', Scope option defaults to email openid . If you selected another scopes, you may want to add them as well: 'OAuth.providers.cognito.options.scope' => 'email openid profile', Finally we just need to go to /login.     and click on Sign in with Cognito. If everything is setup correctly you should see the following screen:   You can previously create a user in AWS panel or just click signup on that screen. After login you will be redirected to homepage in CakePHP App. As you can see, the setup for both Cognito and App are simple if you use default settings. However after testing defaults, you can start customizing forms, fields, adding third party apps. You have no limits.  

Last words

We create and maintain many open source plugins as well as contribute to the CakePHP Community as part of our open source work in CakeDC. While developing this provider, we've also published a generic Oauth2 Amazon Cognito repository. Reference  

Boost CakePHP using RoadRunner Plugin

https://github.com/CakeDC/cakephp-roadrunner was just released! Some time ago we developed a bridge for the PHP Process Manager, and now we've integrated with another alternative, a fast, go based, PHP application server (see https://github.com/spiral/roadrunner) Using this approach, and configuring nginx + roadrunner + cakephp, we're getting ~1500 requests per second for a typical index operation (including database access), and over 2200 (!) requests per second using a cached resultset. Here's what you need to do:

  • composer require cakedc/cakephp-roadrunner
  • Download roadrunner binary and place the file in your filesystem, for example under /usr/local/bin/rr
  • Create a RoadRunner worker file, or use the example worker provided
cp vendor/cakedc/cakephp-roadrunner/worker/cakephp-worker.php . cp vendor/cakedc/cakephp-roadrunner/worker/.rr.json . Note the configuration is stored in .rr.json file, check all possible keys here https://github.com/spiral/roadrunner/wiki/Configuration
  • Start the server, either using your own configuration or the sample configuration provided in the plugin
/usr/local/bin/rr serve   Check plugin details here > https://github.com/CakeDC/cakephp-roadrunner

Last words

Please let us know if you use it, we are always improving our plugins - And happy to get issues and pull requests for our open source plugins. As part of our open source work in CakeDC, we maintain many open source plugins as well as contribute to the CakePHP Community.

Integrating Users and ACL plugins in CakePHP

In previous posts, we saw how CakeDC Users plugin can help you to build an application that manages everything related to users: registration, social login, permissions, etc. Recently it has been noted by the team that there are some use cases where a deeper control of permissions is needed - more than is offered in RBAC. Today we’ll go into this using the ACL approach. ACL or Access Control List, refers to the application using a detailed list of objects to decide who can access what. It can be as detailed as particular users and rows through to specifying which action can be performed (i.e user XX has permissions to edit articles but does not have permissions to delete articles). One of the big features of ACL is that both the accessed objects; and objects who ask for access, can be organized in trees. There’s a good explanation of how ACL works in the CakePHP 2.x version of the Book. ACL does not form part of CakePHP core V 3.0 and can be accessed through the use of the cakephp/acl plugin. Let’s just refresh the key concepts of ACL:

  • ACL: Access Control List (the whole paradigm)
  • ACO: Access Control Object (a thing that is wanted), e.g. an action in a controller: creating an article
  • ARO: Access Request Object (a thing that wants to use stuff), e.g. a user or a group of users
  • Permission: relation between an ACO and an ARO
For the purpose of this article - we shall use this use case: You are using CakeDC/users plugin and now want to implement ACL in your application.

Installation

Starting with a brand new CakePHP app: composer selfupdate && composer create-project --prefer-dist cakephp/app acl_app_demo && cd acl_app_demo We are going to use CakeDC/users and cakephp/acl plugins. In a single step we can install them with composer: composer require cakedc/users cakephp/acl Create a DB and set its name and credentials in the config/app.php file of the just created app (in the Datasources/default section). This command can help you out if you are using MySQL: mysql -u root -p -e "create user acl_demo; create database acl_demo; grant all privileges on acl_demo.* to acl_demo;" Plugins will be loaded always with the app. Let’s set them on the bootstrap file: bin/cake plugin load -br CakeDC/Users
bin/cake plugin load -b Acl Now let’s insert a line in bootstrap.php before Users plugin loading, so cakedc/users will read the configuration from the config/users.php file of our app. Configure::write('Users.config', ['users']); This file does not exist yet. The plugin provides a default file which is very good to start with. Just copy it to your app running: cp -i vendor/cakedc/users/config/users.php config/ Also, let’s copy the permissions file the same way to avoid warnings in our log files: cp -i vendor/cakedc/users/config/permissions.php config/ We need to change cakedc/users config: remove RBAC, add ACL. In cakephp/acl there’s ActionsAuthorize & CrudAuthorize. We’ll start just using ActionsAuthorize. We will tell ActionsAuthorize that actions will be under the 'controllers/' node and that the users entity will be MyUsers (an override of the Users entity from the plugin). Edit the Auth/authorize section of config/users.php so that it sets: 'authorize' => [ 'CakeDC/Auth.Superuser', 'Acl.Actions' => [ 'actionPath' => 'controllers/', 'userModel' => 'MyUsers', ], ], Add calls to load components both from Acl & Users plugin in the initialize() method in AppController: class AppController extends Controller { public function initialize() { parent::initialize(); // (...) $this->loadComponent('Acl', [ 'className' => 'Acl.Acl' ]); $this->loadComponent('CakeDC/Users.UsersAuth'); // (...) } // (...) }

Database tables

Some tables are required in the database to let the plugins work. Those are created automatically just by running their own migrations: bin/cake migrations migrate -p CakeDC/Users
bin/cake migrations migrate -p Acl One table from the Acl plugin needs to be fixed because Users migration creates users.id as UUID (CHAR(36)) and Acl migrations creates AROs foreing keys as int(11). Types must match. Let’s fix it adapting the aros table field: ALTER TABLE aros CHANGE foreign_key foreign_key CHAR(36) NULL DEFAULT NULL; Now, it’s time to set our own tables as needed for our app. Let’s suppose we are developing a CMS app as specified in the CMS Tutorial from the CakePHP book. Based on the tutorial, we can create a simplified articles table: CREATE TABLE articles ( id INT AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY, user_id CHAR(36) CHARACTER SET latin1 COLLATE latin1_swedish_ci NOT NULL, title VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL, body TEXT, published BOOLEAN DEFAULT FALSE, created DATETIME, modified DATETIME, FOREIGN KEY user_key (user_id) REFERENCES users(id) ); Note: Specify CHARACTER SET and COLLATE for user_id only if the table CHARACTER SET and COLLATE of the table differ from users.id (than may happen running migrations). They must match. Roles will be dynamic: admin will be allowed to manage them. That means that they has to be stored in a table. CREATE TABLE roles ( id CHAR(36) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, name VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL, created DATETIME, modified DATETIME ); Association between users and roles bill be belongsTo, so we’ll need a foreign key in the users table instead of a role varchar field: ALTER TABLE users ADD role_id CHAR(36) CHARACTER SET latin1 COLLATE latin1_swedish_ci NULL DEFAULT NULL AFTER role, ADD INDEX role_id (role_id), ADD FOREIGN KEY (role_id) REFERENCES roles(id); ALTER TABLE users DROP role;

Baking

Time to think about what will be ACOs and AROs. In most cases, Users will be the only AROs. To do that, we need to link the Users entity and table to the ACL plugin. In this case that we are using CakeDC/users plugin, we first need to extend the plugin as it is explained in the docs. We will also add the behavior and parentNode() as shown in the cakephp/acl readme file, so at the end we’ll need to create those files: src/Model/Entity/MyUser.php: <?php namespace App\Model\Entity; use CakeDC\Users\Model\Entity\User; /** * Application specific User Entity with non plugin conform field(s) */ class MyUser extends User { public function parentNode() { return ['Roles' => ['id' => $this->role_id]]; } } src/Model/Table/MyUsersTable.php: <?php namespace App\Model\Table; use CakeDC\Users\Model\Table\UsersTable; class MyUsersTable extends UsersTable { public function initialize(array $config) { parent::initialize($config); $this->addBehavior('Acl.Acl', ['requester']); $this->belongsTo('Roles'); $this->hasMany('Articles'); } } Run bin/cake bake controller MyUsers (beware of case) Then, edit the top of src/Controller/MyUsersController.php as: <?php namespace App\Controller; use App\Controller\AppController; use CakeDC\Users\Controller\Traits\LinkSocialTrait; use CakeDC\Users\Controller\Traits\LoginTrait; use CakeDC\Users\Controller\Traits\ProfileTrait; use CakeDC\Users\Controller\Traits\ReCaptchaTrait; use CakeDC\Users\Controller\Traits\RegisterTrait; use CakeDC\Users\Controller\Traits\SimpleCrudTrait; use CakeDC\Users\Controller\Traits\SocialTrait; class MyUsersController extends AppController { use LinkSocialTrait; use LoginTrait; use ProfileTrait; use ReCaptchaTrait; use RegisterTrait; use SimpleCrudTrait; use SocialTrait; // CRUD methods ... To generate the template files for MyUsers we can run: bin/cake bake template MyUsers Next, just let Cake bake all objects for articles and roles: bin/cake bake all Articles
bin/cake bake all Roles Add behavior to their tables. ArticlesTable will act as controlled because it will represent ACOs: class ArticlesTable extends Table { public function initialize(array $config) { parent::initialize($config); // (...) $this->addBehavior('Acl.Acl', ['controlled']); // (...) The case of RolesTable will be similar but it will act as requester, as it will represent AROs: class RolesTable extends Table { public function initialize(array $config) { parent::initialize($config); // (...) $this->addBehavior('Acl.Acl', ['requester']); // (...) Create the parentNode() method in both entities: Article and Role. public function parentNode() { return null; }

Testing

Ok, time to test the whole system! At this point, the app should be ready to use. At least, for an administrator. Let’s quickly create one: it is as easy as running bin/cake users add_superuser. New credentials will appear on screen. When accessing our app in the URL that we installed it, a login form will appear. Log as the just created admin. First, let’s create some roles. Go to /roles in your app’s URL. Then, click on "New Role". Create the roles:
  • Author
  • Editor
  • Reader
Then, we can create two users an author and a reader. Head to /my-users and add them. Remember to select the Active checkbox and the proper role in the dropdown menu. Because MyUsers has the AclBehavior, AROs has been automatically created while creating users, along with the created roles. Check it out with bin/cake acl view aro Aro tree: --------------------------------------------------------------- [1] Roles.24c5646d-133d-496d-846b-af951ddc60f3 [4] MyUsers.7c1ba036-f04b-4f7b-bc91-b468aa0b7c55 [2] Roles.5b221256-0ca8-4021-b262-c6d279f192ad [3] Roles.25908824-15e7-4693-b340-238973f77b59 [5] MyUsers.f512fcbe-af31-49ab-a5f6-94d25189dc78 --------------------------------------------------------------- Imagine that we decided that authors will be able to write new articles and readers will be able to view them. First, let’s create the root node for all controllers: bin/cake acl create aco root controllers Then, let’s inform ACL that there are such things as articles: bin/cake acl create aco controllers Articles Now, we will tell that there are 5 actions related to Articles: bin/cake acl create aco Articles index bin/cake acl create aco Articles view bin/cake acl create aco Articles add bin/cake acl create aco Articles edit bin/cake acl create aco Articles delete We can see the first branch of the ACOs tree here: bin/cake acl view aco Aco tree: --------------------------------------------------------------- [1] controllers [2] Articles [3] index [4] view [5] add [6] edit [7] delete --------------------------------------------------------------- ACL knows that articles can be added, so let’s tell who can do that. We can check which aro.id belongs to role Author with: mysql> select id from roles where name like 'Author'; +--------------------------------------+ | id | +--------------------------------------+ | 24c5646d-133d-496d-846b-af951ddc60f3 | +--------------------------------------+ 1 row in set (0.00 sec) And the same with the Reader role:: mysql> select id from roles where name like 'Reader'; +--------------------------------------+ | id | +--------------------------------------+ | 25908824-15e7-4693-b340-238973f77b59 | +--------------------------------------+ 1 row in set (0.00 sec) So, if we look up this id in the bin/cake acl view aro output, it turns out that aro.id 1 is Author and that aro.id 3 is Reader. If we want to let authors (ARO 1) add articles (ACO 5), we must grant permission to Articles/add to editors by running: bin/cake acl grant 1 5 And we'll grant readers (ARO 3) view articles (ACO 4) with: bin/cake acl grant 3 4 Don't forget to grant access to Articles/index for all roles, or nobody would access /articles: bin/cake acl grant 1 3 bin/cake acl grant 2 3 bin/cake acl grant 3 3 Note: Obviously, it would be easier to set a "super role" which includes the 3 roles and grant access to index to it, but we don't want to add too many steps in this tutorial. You can try it for yourself. Then, aros_acos table becomes: mysql> select * from aros_acos; +----+--------+--------+---------+-------+---------+---------+ | id | aro_id | aco_id | _create | _read | _update | _delete | +----+--------+--------+---------+-------+---------+---------+ | 1 | 1 | 5 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | | 2 | 3 | 4 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | | 3 | 1 | 3 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | | 4 | 2 | 3 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | | 5 | 3 | 3 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | +----+--------+--------+---------+-------+---------+---------+ 5 rows in set (0.00 sec) Let’s create a new article as the first user. To do that:
  • Log out (we are still logged in as superadmin) going to /logout
  • Log in as the first created user
  • Go to /articles
  • Create an article
Right now, author can add an article but not view it, since we only set the add permission. Check it out clicking in View next to the article. Log in as a reader to check how the reader can really view the article. Obviously, more than a couple of permissions have to be grant in a big app. This tutorial served just as an example to start.

Last words

That's all for now related to the use of ACL in a webapp made with CakePHP. A lot more can be done with ACL. Next step would be to use CrudAuthorize to specify which CRUD permissions are granted for any ARO to any ACO. Keep visiting the blog for new articles! This tutorial has been tested with:
  • CakePHP 3.5.10
  • CakeDC/users 6.0.0
  • cakephp/acl 0.2.6
An example app with the steps followed in this tutorial is available in this GitHub repo. Please let us know if you use it, we are always improving on them - And happy to get issues and pull requests for our open source plugins. As part of our open source work in CakeDC, we maintain many open source plugins as well as contribute to the CakePHP Community. Reference

We Bake with CakePHP