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Quick glossary: DevOps

Has your team gotten you down with the use of so many terms that seem so unfamiliar? Don’t despair! The ability to rapidly develop, deploy and integrate new software is essential to success - but you should be aware of the terms that the dev ops team will be using!

First starting off with devops - which is a mash-up of two terms: "software development" and "information technology operations. But there are more

A/B testing

A technique for testing new software or new features whereby two or more versions are deployed to users for testing. The metrics from each variant are then compared and assessed based on the testing criteria.

Acceptance testing

The testing performed near the end of the development cycle that determines whether software is ready for deployment.

Agile development

Agile development refers to a methodology that emphasizes short iterative planning and development cycles. The idea is that iterative development affords more control and establishes predictability.  

Behaviour driven development

A development methodology that asserts software should be specified in terms of the desired behavior of the application, and with syntax that is readable for business managers.

Build Automation

Tools or frameworks that allow source code to be automatically compiled into releasable binaries. Usually includes code-level unit testing to ensure individual pieces of code behave as expected.

CA Release Automation

CA Release Automation is an enterprise-class, continuous delivery solution that automates complex, multi-tier release deployments through orchestration and promotion of applications from development through production.

Continuous delivery

Continuous Delivery is a set of processes and practices that radically removes waste from your software production process, enables faster delivery of high-quality functionality and sets up a rapid and effective feedback loop between your business and your users.

Deployment Manager

Cloud Deployment Manager allows developers to easily design, deploy, and reuse complex Cloud Platform solutions using simple and flexible declarative templates. From simple web servers to complex highly available clusters, Deployment Manager allows teams to spend less time managing, and more time building.

Delivery pipeline

A sequence of orchestrated, automated tasks implementing the software delivery process for a new application version. Each step in the pipeline is intended to increase the level of confidence in the new version to the point where a go/ no-go decision can be made. A delivery pipeline can be considered the result of optimizing an organization’s release process.

Functional testing

Testing of the end-to-end system to validate (new) functionality. With executable specifications, Functional Testing is carried out by running the specifications against the application.

Gitlab

GitLab is a web-based Git repository manager with wiki and issue tracking features. GitLab is similar to GitHub, but GitLab has an open source version, unlike GitHub.

Github

GitHub is a web-based Git repository hosting service, which offers all of the distributed revision control and source code management (SCM) functionality of Git as well as adding its own features. Unlike Git, which is strictly a command-line tool, GitHub provides a web-based graphical interface and desktop as well as mobile integration.

Lean

“Lean manufacturing” or “lean production” is an approach or methodology that aims to reduce waste in a production process by focussing on preserving value. Largely derived from practices developed by Toyota in car manufacturing, lean concepts have been applied to software development as part of agile methodologies. The Value Stream Map (VSM), which attempts to visually identify valuable and wasteful process steps, is a key lean tool.

Micro services

Microservices is a software architecture design pattern, in which complex applications are composed of small, independent processes communicating with each other using language-agnostic APIs. These services are small, highly decoupled and focus on doing a small task.

NoOps

A type of organization in which the management of systems on which applications run is either handled completely by an external party (such as a PaaS vendor) or fully automated. A NoOps organization aims to maintain little or no in-house operations capability or staff.

Non-Functional•Requirements (NFRs)

The specification of system qualities such as ease-of-use, clarity of design, latency, speed, ability to handle large numbers of users etc. that describe how easily or effectively a piece of functionality can be used, rather than simply whether it exists. These characteristics can also be addressed and improved using the Continuous Delivery feedback loop.

Orchestration pipeline

Tools or products that enable the various automated tasks that make up a Continuous Delivery pipeline to be invoked at the right time. They generally also record the state and output of each of those tasks and visualize the flow of features through the pipeline.

Whitebox testing

A testing or quality assurance practice which is based on verifying the correct functioning of the internals of a system by examining its (internal) behavior and state as it runs.

 

Latest articles

Building an RBAC based application in CakePHP (2/2)

This is the second article about RBAC in CakePHP series (2/2). In our previous post we did a quick introduction to RBAC and how to setup CakeDC/Auth plugin in an example project, dealing with basic array based rules. Today we'll talk about how to debug rules, and provide complex Auth rules to check permissions. We'll also discuss how to encapsulate the rules logic into `Rules` classes, and how to deal with RBAC in big projects.  

Debugging rules

Notice when debug is enabled, a detailed trace of the matched rule allowing a given action is logged into debug.log For example: 2017-10-04 23:58:10 Debug: For {"prefix":null,"plugin":null,"extension":null,"controller":"Categories","action":"index","role":"admin"} --> Rule matched {"role":"*","controller":"*","action":["index","view"],"allowed":true} with result = 1 This log could save you some time while debugging why a specific action is granted.

Callbacks for complex authentication rules

Let's imagine a more complex rule, for example, we want to block access to the articles/add action if the user has more than 3 articles already created. In this case we are going to use a callback to define at runtime the result of the allowed key in the rule. [ 'role' => '*', 'controller' => 'Articles', 'action' => 'add', 'allowed' => function (array $user, $role, \Cake\Http\ServerRequest $request) { $userId = $user['id'] ?? null; if (!$userId) { return false; } $articlesCount = \Cake\ORM\TableRegistry::get('Articles')->findByUserId($userId)->count(); return $articlesCount <= 3; } ],

Rules example

As previously discussed, we have the ability to create complex logic to check if a given role is allowed to access an action, but we could also extend this concept to define permission rules that affect specific users. One common use case is allowing the owner of the resource access to a restricted set of actions, for example the author of a given article could have access to edit and delete the entry. This case was so common that we've included a predefined Rule class you can use after minimal configuration. The final rule would be like this one: [ 'role' => '*', 'controller' => 'Articles', 'action' => ['edit', 'delete'], 'allowed' => new \CakeDC\Auth\Rbac\Rules\Owner(), ], The Owner rule will use by default the user_id field in articles table to match the logged in user id. You can customize the columns, and how the article id is extracted. This covers most of the cases where you need to identify the owner of a given row to assign specific permissions.

Other considerations

Permissions and big projects

Having permission rules in a single file could be a solution for small projects, but when they grow, it's usually hard to manage them. How could we deal with the complexity?
  • Break permission file into additional configuration files
  • Per role, usually a good idea when you have a different set of permissions per role. You can use the Configure class to append the permissions, usually having a defaults file with common permissions would be a good idea, then you can read N files, one per role to apply the specific permissions per role.
  • Per feature/plugin, useful when you have a lot of actions, and a small set of roles, or when the roles are mostly the same regarding permissions, with a couple changes between them. In this case you will define the rules in N files, each one covering a subset of the actions in your application, for example invoices.php file would add the pemissions to the Invoices plugin. In the case you work with plugins, keep in mind you could write the permission rules inside each plugin and share/distribute the rules if you reuse the plugin in other apps (as long as the other apps will have similar roles).
  • QA and maintenance
  • It's always a good idea to think about the complexity of testing the application based on the existing roles. Automated integration testing helps a lot, but if you are planning to have some real humans doing click through, each role will multiply the time to pass a full regression test on the release. Key question here is "Do we really need this role?"
  • Having a clear and documented permissions matrix file, with roles vs actions and either "YES" | "NO" | "RuleName" in the cell value will help a lot to understand if the given role should be allowed to access to a given action. If it's a CSV file it could be actually used to create a unit test and check at least the static permission rules.
  • Debugging and tracing is also important, for that reason we've included a trace feature in CakeDC/Auth that logs to debug.log the rule matched to allow/deny a specific auth check.

About performance

Performance "could" become an issue in the case you have a huge amount of rules, and some of them would require database access to check if they are matching. As a general recommendation, remember the following tips:
  • Rules are matched top to bottom
  • Try to leave the permission rules reading the database to the end of the file
  • Cache the commonly used queries, possibly the same query will be used again soon
  • Note cache invalidation is always fun, and could lead to very complex scenarios, keep it simple
  • If you need too much context and database interaction for a given rule, maybe the check should be done elsewhere. You could give some flexibility and get some performance in return

Last words

We've collected some notes about the implementation of a RBAC based system in CakePHP using our CakeDC/Auth plugin. As stated before, there are many other ways, but this is ours, worked well on several projects and we thought it was a good idea to share it with other members of the CakePHP community to expose a possible solution for their next project Authorization flavor. Please let us know if you use it, we are always improving on them - And happy to get issues and pull requests for our open source plugins. As part of our open source work in CakeDC, we maintain many open source plugins as well as contribute to the CakePHP Community. Reference

Building an RBAC based application in CakePHP (1/2)

This is the first post of a small series covering how to setup, organize and implement an RBAC based authorization system in CakePHP using the CakeDC/Auth Plugin. We'll cover the basic concepts, setup and implementation of the basic permission rules in part 1.

What does RBAC mean in this context?

We'll use RBAC as "Role Base Access Control", meaning your app will be using the following concepts to define who can access what:
  • "Who" is an existing user, mainly identified as his role in the system, such as an "admin" or "writer", etc.
  • "What" is a specific action in your application, identified as the associated routing params, for example ['controller' => 'Posts', 'action' => 'add'].
  • A permission in this context would be a link between who, and what.

Why not ACL?

ACL is a really good choice when your answer is 'yes' to any of the following questions:
  • Do we need to let users create new roles on the fly?
  • Do we need the roles to inherit permissions (tree structure)?
  • Do we need to assign permissions NOT based on controller actions? For example CRUD based permissions, checked on the model layer for each operation on a given row.
If your answer is yes, you should consider using cakephp/acl. It provides a very powerful, reliable and flexible way to configure your permissions, but with greater power comes a bigger maintenance burden, that is keeping the acl data in your tables. Specially if you have several environments to maintain, you'll need to write migrations to populate your acl tables, then create import/export scripts and utilities to reproduce permission issues from live environments, and so on. Not an impossible task, but could increase the complexity of your project in a significant way...

Setting up CakeDC/Auth

There are other plugins you could use, but this one will cover everything you'll need, so let's go. CakeDC/Auth usually comes installed from within CakeDC/Users (a complete solution covering many more features) but today we'll set it up alone. composer require cakedc/auth bin/cake plugin load CakeDC/Auth And last, but not least, add the RBAC Auth to the list of Authorize objects. Here is a working configuration based on the blog tutorial. We'll be using the blog tutorial described in the book as an example application Change AppController.php Auth related configuration to: $this->loadComponent('Auth', [ 'authorize' => ['CakeDC/Auth.SimpleRbac'], 'loginRedirect' => [ 'controller' => 'Articles', 'action' => 'index' ], 'logoutRedirect' => [ 'controller' => 'Pages', 'action' => 'display', 'home' ] ]); With this change, we'll be using only the rules defined in config/permissions.php file. If this file is not present, default permissions will be in place. Default permissions will grant access to admin role to all actions. To override permissions, you can copy the default permissions to your project and fix the rules: cp vendor/cakedc/auth/config/permissions.php config/ Then edit this file and check the provided examples and defaults.

Using CakeDC/Auth

The core of the RBAC system is the ability to define permission rules that will match one given role with the actions granted. Rules are defined in an array, but you can extend the AbstractProvider class to retrieve the rules from somewhere else (database?). By default, nothing will be granted. Rules are evaluated top to bottom. The first rule matched will stop the evaluation, and the authentication result will be provided by the value of the allowed key. Note we can use a callback to implement complex rules, or encapsulate the rules into classes that we could reuse across projects, like the Owner rule class provided. This is an example rule [ 'role' => '*', 'plugin' => 'CakeDC/Users', 'controller' => 'Users', 'action' => ['profile', 'logout'], ], We could read this rule as follows: "For any role, we grant access to actions 'profile' and 'logout' in the Users controller in plugin CakeDC/Users". Note default allowed value is true, we can use an array, or a string to determine the role, plugin, controller and action. We can also use * in the value to match anything or use * at the start of the key to match anything but the values, for example '*controller' => 'Users', would match all the controllers but 'Users'.

Simple Rules

As our first objective, we are going to grant access to all the index and view pages, using the rule [ 'role' => '*', 'controller' => '*', 'action' => ['index', 'view'], ],
Stay tuned for the second post, where we'll deal with complex rules, rule classes and implementation tips for complex applications...

Has your website been hacked? Learn more on what you can do

If you have a website and have not made the necessary security precautions, then you may become victim to hacking.   Besides the obvious defacing that can take place once your website has fallen victim, here are some other signs you have been hacked:

  • Your website redirects to another site, not your own.
  • Google or Bing notifies you.
  • Your browser indicates that your site is not secure.
  • You notice a change in your website traffic, especially from different countries.
  So you’ve been hacked - what do you do? Where do you start?   We’ve put together a few things that you need to look into as soon as possible!  
  • Do you have a support team? Contact them!
In this situation, it is best to immediately contact your technical support - your web developers who have experience in how to handle these situations. From what to shut down, what to look for and where to check. Someone without the technical expertise to help you is going to have difficulty properly fixing things!  
  • Get together all of the information required for your support team
Your support team will need all the access information, so start putting this together - things they will need access to include your CMS; hosting provider and login details; web logs, FTP/sFTP access credentials as well as any back ups you may have. If you have never been hacked or do not have regular back ups running - here’s a good place to start.  
  • Temporarily take your website down
If you haven’t already done so, make sure to take your site down temporarily. While you are doing this, it is also important to check all your servers and computers for malware, spyware or trojans. And if you have a virtual server, it may be in the best interest to start over - some attacks leave software that may not be visible or you may not know what to look for.  
  • Change your passwords
Make sure to change your passwords! Not sure what to use? For the best security, make use of a password generator that includes both letters and numbers of more than 12.
  For expert development and consultation services, give CakeDC a call - we lead, so you can lead.

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