CakeDC Blog

TIPS, INSIGHTS AND THE LATEST FROM THE EXPERTS BEHIND CAKEPHP

Felix Geisendörfer - Javascript and Git

Felix gave a demonstration of the production level javascript separation and management that the team at Debuggable use in order to minimise the amount of Javasript that needs to be sent to the client for any specific page view, and to ensure the logic is separated into the pages that it is used for. This creates a better management system for Javascript than using a single file. In addition to this separation, Felix gave an overview of common practices and operations for using Git for version control in a day to day environment. This included: merges, conflict resolution, fast forwarding branches, and managing multiple repositories. Largely this presentation was an interactive one, and to gain the most out of it, you really needed to be there.

Marius Wilms - The CakePHP Media Plugin

If Marius had more than an hour to talk about the Media Plugin, he most certainly would have taken it. To go over the features and functionality of the entire plugin would have been many hours as there is a lot there. A brief touch on the features provided by the plugin was discussed, with some examples. Requirements are in the high end, but considering the state of PHP and the upcoming version of CakePHP, developers should be moving forward in terms of their PHP version and library support anyway. The Media plugin requires CakePHP 1.2.x.x and PHP 5.2.0+. It enables the transfer, manipulation and embedding of files in many varied ways. You can find the media plugin at: http://github.com/davidpersson/media Marius' focus was on doing media manipulation and embedding "properly", and identified that while there are lots of user contributions floating around the net, none of them were meeting his needs and were flexible enough. One of the main points he made here was that if done incorrectly, potential security risks arise due to command line interaction and file saving. Validation was one particular section of the code that made this a tricky plugin to develop, but allowed tests to be implemented to ensure security. Some common points that we hear all the time came through, and they make sense for CakePHP as well as any web application for security reasons:  

  1. Don't trust users supplied filenames
  2. Don't store files in an accessible webroot, rather have them accessible to scripts.
  3. Make the upload location (and local filenames) unguessable (like referencing files by UUIDs)
The media plugin contains about 8 new rules for file validation purposes to ensure that submitted data meets the application needs. Beyond validation, it handles all kinds of uploads, HTTP Post, Remote HTTP and local file inclusion.
A console is included to initialize the default directory structure, and as such, could be included as part of a deployment script with the CakePHP console.examples.
To ensure flexibility of use, a behavior is included to allow attachment to any number of models, and generioc storage and linking provided to ease integration into existing apps.
Marius concluded his talk with a plea for feedback. There are plenty of people using the plugin, but more feedback is required to ensure its the best it can be, and that all bugs  (if any) are squashed. Checkout the code at: http://github.com/davidpersson/media

Robert Scherer - Multi-Tenancy in CakePHP

Robert's talk was unscheduled, but ended up being a great case study for an insurance sales white-labelling solution that his company had undertaken and completed. Robert talked about multi-tenancy, and what this means for a web application, and how it relates to SaaS architecture. Challenges to be solved included:

  1. Differences in functionality
  2. Workflow differences
  3. Separation and security of data
  4. Branding and visual differences
Auth and Acl Components were used to solve a lot of the problems described, but in addition, Robert discussed the development of Modules as a new addon / plugin structure that allowed the addition, removal or configuration of application items at any level (Model, View or Controller).
Configuration of the modules was broken up into system default, mandators, and dealers configuration, allowing for inheritance of options along the way. To solve the view specific differences, built in themes were used to provide the differences required. This is a CakePHP builtin mechanism that serviced their needs well. Much of Robert's talk went through visuals of the site itself, and should we be able to get our hands on these, will post them up to see the various differences in presentation, and the module structure in terms of MVC.

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Neil Crookes - Bake Master Class

After an introduction to bake, and what this shell means within CakePHP, Neil went on to explain and show examples of the code generation templates and capabilities provided by default. The bake shell is broken down into tasks and a main shell. These tasks separate out the logic required for various main task subsets including controller, model and view baking, amongst others. The main bake shell is found in the CakePHP directory cake/console/libs/bake.php. Tasks used by this shell are defined in the $tasks variable. Bake extends the CakeShell class and executes calls based on whether the users want interactive or non-interactive tasks through the __interactive() and bake() methods respectively. Neil made the suggestion that a persistent MySQL connection might be a good idea to stop database connection timeouts. Following this introduction, a great walkthrough of customisation of the bake process and templates was demonstrated. This included the addition of a new Shell that allows for multiple bakes to be done automatically of the same type. Neil has been kind enough to host the code, and you can find this over at the CakeFest downloads page.

Felix Geisendörfer - Recipies for succ...

Felix liked to Get Things Done™. And through experience and what became an interactive idea and experience sharing productivity session, he explained mechanisms and methods that he has used to achieve the best results for projects in the shortest time possible. Communication. While this means your team should be in contact, and that those contact points should be quality communication, it doesn't mean that instant communication is a requirement. Communication mechanisms would ideally be: decentralised and work in an offline capacity (at least for partial functionality). Return on investment is an interesting statistic to consider when responding to or creating a new item of communication. Provide a concise message. Enough to ensure the intention of the communication is clear, and ambiguity is reduced if not eliminated. Email is a great tool, especially for the following: Timezone differences, announcements, spawning debates that require discussion, emergency notifications / reports, mailing lists, shared email accounts and automated reporting / information. Using Email over an instant messaging mechanism for spawning debates allows contributors to formulate a constructed response. This can assist the better understanding of some ones input to the discussions, as instant messaging can be difficult for items that require discussion. Instant messaging has good and bad traits:

  1. Good Stuff
    1. Instant
    2. Group Chats / conference calls
    3. Varying methods of communication
    4. Various formats (text, voice, video)
  2. Bad Stuff
    1. Distracting (interrupts workflow)
    2. History tracking / compatibility
    3. Citations / logs
Task management helps keep projects on track. However the truth is that there is no overall solution. We do the best we can to manage all the information we need to be successful, through a variety of tools.
Problems that exist are:
  1. Getting tasks into the system (May be the laziness of users)
  2. Tracking tasks that manage to make it into the system
  3. Getting those tasks done
Tools available:
  1. Pen and Paper (plain text files)
  2. OmniFocus (Mac Only)
  3. Lighthouse / TheChaw
One of the CakeFest attendees suggested post-it notes on a wall, so that the tam involved in pursuing the tasks can have some physical interaction with them, making the experience more productive and fun.
So with this in mind, Felix quickly went over what has worked for him and his company:
  1. Check emails twice a day only.
  2. Turn off instant messaging tools in the morning
  3. Set clear distinct goals for the day, and achieve those goals
How to fail at unit testing. Felix described some common myths about unit testing, how he feels failing is possible and how to improve your approach.
Failed unit testing can come from factors such as: Attempting to reach 100% code coverage all the time, misunderstanding test driven development and expecting that all developers / users can write unit tests.
Success can be achieved by approaching projects with a top-down approach, incorporating performance tests and re-factoring code. Continuous integration was presented in a basic format, going through the setup that Felix has found useful, making use of git post-receive hooks, and parsing of results to send notifications when necessary. In terms of increasing productivity and performance overall, Felix has begun testing Pair programming, where there is one computer for two people, and the development process is discussed ongoing, meaning that a lot of bugs an individual would miss are caught by the secondary developer on the first code pass. Virtualization though open source and free products like VirtualBox and VMWare Server are worthwhile investigating for cheap scaling testing during development.
Version control was introduced, referencing the change of CakePHP to git from subversion, pointing out the benefits including: decentralization, can work offline, can work semi-online though the use of adhoc networks, its very fast to operate and its more intelligent with the storage of information. Following this, a detailed example of three separate working repositories was demonstrated.

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